Inns North Canadian Arctic Hotels
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Arctic Animals and Lands - Marine Mammals

Inns North Canadian Arctic Hotels

The waters of the North are teeming with animal life. Nowhere else in the world will you find an ocean filled with the variety and number of mammals that call the Arctic home. Here you will meet the elusive unicorn of the deep, the Narwhal. You will glimpse the awesome majesty of the polar bear. These are once-in-a-lifetime encounters.

Among the most traditionally important marine mammals to the Inuit is the seal. The ringed seal has made an indelible mark on these resourceful people. Besides being a main staple in the diet, the seal has also provided skin for clothing and dog harnesses and blubber for lamps.

Awkward on land but graceful in the water, the whiskered walrus was hunted traditionally for its precious ivory tusks. These giant mammals can be found packed tightly on ice floes in the shallow water that allows them easy access to clams on the sea floor.

A large number of whales frequent the waters here, although there are only three different species that can be truly called Arctic whales. Arctic whales include the ghostly white Beluga, the single-tusked Narwhal and the giant Bowhead Whale, which weighs in at nearly 100 tonnes. Killer Whales (Orcas) are also seen in the area in the summer months, along with Sperm Whales and the world's largest living mammals, Blue Whales. Not surprisingly, one of the most popular activities in the North is whale watching.

Another "world's largest" draws visitors by the thousands to Nunavut. As the world's largest land carnivore, the Polar Bear spends most of its time on sea ice and in the water hunting ringed seals. Many would feel a trip to Nunavut is not complete until a Polar Bear has been sighted. Once you see one yourself for the first time, you'll understand why.

Marine Mammal Populations in Inns North Communities:

Bearded Seal ~ Distinguished by long, drooping whiskers, the Bearded Seal is unique among Nunavut's seals. The Bearded Seal is a bottom feeder and feeds on crustaceans, mollusks, worms, hermit crabs, and clams. Found in:
Cambridge Bay; Ulukhaktok; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Kimmirut; Naujaat (Repulse Bay); Sanikiluaq

Beluga Whale ~ These small toothed white whales reach about four to five metres in length, and are found throughout Nunavut. Beluga Whales winter in areas of open water or shifting ice, moving northward in the spring. Found in:
Arviat; Baker Lake; Chesterfield Inlet; Gjoa Haven; Hall Beach;
Ulukhaktok; Kimmirut; Pond Inlet; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Resolute Bay ; Sanikiluaq; Whale Cove

Bowhead Whale ~ This baleen whale with its large head is also known as a Right Whale. The Bowhead Whale is the giant among Arctic whales, reaching 18 metres long and weighing 100 tonnes. Found in:
Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Kugaaruk; Pond Inlet; Naujaat (Repulse Bay); Resolute

Harbour Seal ~ Known also as the common seal, the Harbour Seal is usually grey with dark blotches. Found in:
Cambridge Bay; Hall Beach; Ulukhaktok; Kimmirut; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Naujaat (Repulse Bay); Sanikiluaq

Harp Seal ~ Harp Seals are distinguished by the black, harp-shaped saddle on their backs. About 500,000 Harp Seals are found in the summer in Nunavut. They migrate north when the sea ice finally yields in spring. Found in:
Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Naujaat (Repulse Bay)

Narwhal ~ Native to the Arctic seas, the Narwhal is called the "unicorn of the sea". It is mottled brown, averages four metres in length and weighs nearly two tonnes. The male Narwhal' s left tooth forms a straight ivory tusk. Found in:
Cambridge Bay; Kimmirut; Kugaaruk; Pond Inlet; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Resolute Bay

Orcas
(see also Bowhead and Beluga Whales) ~ Also known as the Killer Whale, the Orca has distinctive black and white markings. It can reach 10 metres in length. Found in:
Chesterfield Inlet; Kimmirut; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Pond Inlet

Polar Bear
~The white Polar Bear is native to the Arctic ice pack and surrounding seas. Polar Bears are excellent swimmers and spend most of their lives on the sea ice and in the water. They are the world's largest carnivores, Found in:
Arviat; Baker Lake; Cambridge Bay; Chesterfield Inlet ;Hall Beach; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Kugaaruk; Pond Inlet; Resolute Bay; Sanikiluaq; Whale Cove


Ringed Seal ~The R
inged Seal gets its name from its irregular, light-colored rings with dark centres. Inuit have long relied on this seal. The Ringed Seal is the smallest and most common marine mammal in the territory. Found in:

Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Sanikiluaq

Seals
(see also Bearded Seal, Harp Seal and Harbour Seal) ~ The seal is a marine mammal that has short fur and a thick layer of blubber. There are 19 different species of seal in the world. Found in:
Arviat; Baker Lake; Gjoa Haven; Kimmirut; Kugaaruk; Pond Inlet; Resolute;

Walrus
: ~ The walrus is a marine mammal reaching 3.5 metres in length and weighing 1,400 kilograms. Found in:
Arviat;Hall Beach; Kimmirut; Qikiqtarjuaq (Broughton Island); Kugaaruk; Pond Inlet; Naujaat (Repulse Bay); Sanikiluaq
 
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Inns North Canadian Arctic Hotels

Inns North Canadian Arctic Hotels hotels are located in:

Arviat, Nunavut
Baker Lake, Nunavut
Cambridge Bay, Nunavut
Chesterfield Inlet, Nunavut
Gjoa Haven, Nunavut
Hall Beach, Nunavut
Igloolik, Nunavut
Kimmirut, Nunavut
Kugaaruk, Nunavut
Pangnirtung, Nunavut
Pond Inlet, Nunavut
Qikiqtarjuaq, Nunavut
Rankin Inlet, Nunavut
Naujaat, Nunavut
Resolute Bay, Nunavut
Sanikiluaq, Nunavut
Whale Cove, Nunavut
Fort McPherson, NWT
Ulukhaktok, NWT

 


 
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